Monday, August 31, 2009

Changes and enhancements to electronic resources

Take a fresh look at the changes and enhancements in the State Library’s electronic resources. As fall progresses, we will provide detailed articles. In the meantime, take advantage of webinars on the training calendar or schedule a training or inservice for your staff or colleagues. Here’s what’s new, what’s changed and what’s no longer available.

More resources in the news


  • AASL’s Best Websites for Teaching & Learning: Aligned with AASL's Standards for the 21st Century Learner
  • 100 Best Blogs for Librarians of the Future
  • A blog that librarians might find useful is Libraries, Spanish and Kids. The blog is by and for children’s librarians who serve Spanish-speaking children.
  • GovFresh: a live feed of official U.S. Government information posted via YouTube, Twitter, RSS, Facebook and Flickr. The feed combines data from the House & Senate, the military, Supreme Court, White House, Democratic & Republication National Committees, various departments and agencies, and so on.
  • Computer Hardware in Plain English: We love Common Craft videos. They cover software, Web 2.0, and more, including how basic computer hardware works. Take a look — this might be the next tool you use in your basic computer classes.
  • From the Publisher’s Office (wayback machine capture), an online destination where librarians, teachers, and fans can see author interviews, book trailers, supplemental educational content and listen to read-alouds. Check out Penguin Storytime and YA Central.






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Originally posted at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2009/aug/2009-08h.asp

What are we reading?

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows

book cover of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society




Written via a series of letters, this book introduces us to writer Juliet Ashton. In 1946, Juliet receives a letter from a complete stranger, a member of a secret book club formed by residents of Guernsey during WWII. Read how Guernsey, its inhabitants, and their stories of life under Nazi occupation affect Juliet’s world.

Monday, August 24, 2009

Where do all those public library numbers go?


Where do all those public library numbers go? Sometimes in the midst of collecting your library’s annual statistics you might think such thoughts. In fact all those numbers become like rain drops to create a mighty river. Each state library is required to submit their public library statistics by a specified deadline. Yes, we have deadlines too. South Dakota’s deadline was July 30 this year. After we gather local statistics on Collect, our vendor, Bibliostat, helps us prepare the data for federal submission. Once we get that done, then the real work (for us) begins as staff members work through hundreds of “error reports” or “edit checks” to create legitimate matches with existing data. Lastly, Daria spent dozens of hours in July “matching” our Bibliostat PLS data sets with the cumbersome federal WebPlus. The State Library hopes to do an overhaul of our questions and our definitions and to pre-fill general data so that errors and typos cannot occur. Pre-filling data—official library names, addresses, phone numbers, etc. will also save local librarians time as well.

Improving Literacy Through School Libraries Grant awarded to Cheyenne River Reservation Schools


Three school libraries on the Cheyenne River Reservation have been awarded an Improving Literacy through School Libraries grant in the amount of approximately $286,000. The three schools: Eagle Butte School District 20-1 (Upper Elementary), Dupree School and Timber Lake School have an enrollment of 1,625 students. They will be served by the grant through an infusion of books and digital media, modern library computer technology, extended student access hours to library staff, media, and resources, and training opportunities for professional library staff. This grant will be the primary public school source for these library resources.

According to Gay Mraz, Dupree School librarian, goals envisioned for the grant are increased connectivity to the outside world in a vast and geographically isolated area, updated library management software, enhanced professional development opportunities, additional audiovisual and multimedia resources and equipment, and expanded library access after school and during summer months. Depending upon the library, collection development may focus on beginning readers, hi-lo resources, curriculum-related nonfiction, and digital/electronic books. Librarians will receive funds allowing them to attend the South Dakota Library Association annual conference and the American Association of School Librarians national conference.

For more information about the Improving Literacy through School Libraries grant go to ed.gov.



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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2009/aug/2009-08a.asp

TechSoup for Libraries ladles up technology information

Feel tripped up by technology? Wondering what the next technology step is for your library? Can’t afford full price for software? TechSoup for Libraries is one place to get answers, whether you are a technology beginner or expert.

Rapid City Public Library engages total community in National Library Card Sign-Up Month


by John Pappas
Rapid City Public Library

Each September, the Rapid City Public Library does a READ poster promotion in conjunction with the local businesses and non-profits of Rapid City. During that time, we display READ posters in both of our libraries (RCPL-Downtown and RCPL-North) to help promote the businesses and non-profits that work with us on a daily basis to encourage library card registration.

Monday, August 17, 2009

Finalists named in ALAN's Young Adult Fiction awards


The Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the National Council of Teachers of English has announced the finalists of its inaugural Amelia Elizabeth Walden Book Award for Young Adult Fiction. Established in 2008 to honor the wishes of young adult author Amelia Elizabeth Walden, the award allows for $5,000 to be presented annually to the author of a young adult title selected for demonstrating a positive approach to life, widespread teen appeal and literary merit. This year’s winning title will be announced at an open reception and reading at the 2009 ALAN Workshop in Philadelphia.

The finalists for 2009 (in alphabetical order by title) are:
  • After Tupac and D Foster, by Jacqueline Woodson (Putnam)
  • Graceling, by Kristin Cashore (Harcourt)
  • The Graveyard Book, by Neil Gaiman (HarperCollins)
  • Me, The Missing, and the Dead, by Jenny Valentine (HarperCollins)
  • My Most Excellent Year: A Novel of Love, Mary Poppins, and Fenway Park, by Steve Kluger (Dial)



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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2009/aug/2009-08g.asp

What is streaming media all about?


Remember trying to find a particular song on a cassette, or even worse, on a record? When was the last time you actually missed a television show? Was there ever a time that you had to wait more than twenty minutes for a file to download? Do you know who put the bop in the bop shoo bop shoo bop?

The face of media has changed in the digital age and libraries are changing with it. While we are still getting much of the same content our methods of delivery have changed.

Libraries to receive funding for computers, technology training

Twenty-five South Dakota libraries will benefit from the third round of the Opportunity Online Hardware Grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s U.S. Libraries initiative.

The funds will allow public libraries to obtain and maintain sufficient numbers of computer workstations. Eligible libraries can use the money for hardware upgrades, software, and technology support to ensure that their computers will adequately serve the public for years to come.

The South Dakota State Library will administer the grants, and each community library will have to provide an escalating local match to the grant funds over the next two years.

The 25 South Dakota libraries receiving Gates grants are:

  • A.H. Brown Public Library, Mobridge
  • Alexander Mitchell Public Library, Aberdeen
  • Alexandria Public Library, Alexandria
  • Armour Public Library, Armour
  • Belle Fourche Public Library, Belle Fourche
  • Bison Public Library, Bison
  • Deadwood Public Library, Deadwood
  • Emma Burnham Public Library, Frederick
  • Faulk County Library, Faulkton
  • Grant County Public Library, Milbank
  • Grant County Public Library Branch, Revillo
  • Ihanktonwan Community/College Library, Marty
  • Kimball Centennial Library, Kimball
  • Leola Public Library, Leola
  • Marcus P. Beebe Memorial Library, Ipswich
  • Moody County Resource Center, Flandreau
  • Oglala Lakota College Library, Kyle
  • Phoebe Apperson Hearst Library, Lead
  • Rev. Martin Bieber Public Library, Bowdle
  • Selby Community/School Library, Selby
  • Sinte Gleska University Library, Mission
  • Sisseton Memorial Library, Sisseton
  • Vermillion Public Library, Vermillion
  • Wagner Public Library, Wagner
  • Whitewood Public Library, Whitewood

For more information, visit www.gatesfoundation.org or contact Daria Bossman at the South Dakota State Library at (800) 423-6665.




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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2009/aug/2009-08a.asp

Mystery Room offers quiet, adult space

by Amber Wilde
Grace Balloch Memorial Library


In May 2008, the Grace Balloch Memorial Library in Spearfish celebrated the dedication of the Kathy Follette and Mattie McVey Mystery Room. The room, created in memory of two members of the Spearfish library community – Kathy, a beloved reference librarian lost to cancer in 2007, and Mattie, an educator and patron – has become a source of pride and comfort to library patrons.


Mystery room in Spearfish's Grace Balloch Memorial Library

Monday, August 10, 2009

For Review: What To Do About Alice?

What to Do about Alice? How Alice Roosevelt Broke the Rules, Charmed the World, and Drove Her Father Teddy Crazy! By Barbara Kerley, illustrated by Edwin Fotheringham

President Teddy Roosevelt once stated about his oldest child, “I can be president of the United States, or I can control Alice, but I cannot possibly do both.” Hand this book to the youngster who thinks reading about history and historical figures is boring.

What if everyone in South Dakota read the same book?

The One Book South Dakota program is a statewide initiative sponsored by the SD Humanities Council to get as many people as possible to read and discuss the same title in a six-month period. The selection for 2009 is Dan O’Brien’s 2001 memoir Buffalo for the Broken Heart, a tale about restoring native prairie life to a Black Hills ranch.

Hau Kola Learning Camp builds bridges for students and professionals

by Jasmine Rockwell

girl studying


Throughout my year I get to be involved in many worthwhile projects with libraries. However, one of the most rewarding experiences of my year is working with the Hau Kola Learning Camp every summer. In the past I have worked with the pre-school camp, elementary camp and teen camp. The camp originated in Oglala and has grown to include camps in Pine Ridge, Porcupine and Sisseton over the last two years. The camps focus on helping children and teens retain more of the information they learned throughout the school year, as well as exposing them to new concepts they might not get at school.

This summer was my second working with the teen camp. Approximately 20 teens from the Oglala area come to camp from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and can choose one of three groups to be a part of: the leadership group, the GIS group, or the work group. The first day of camp this year also included a leadership workshop by Joseph Marshall based on his newest book The Power of Four.

Joseph Marshall discusses his book, The Power of Four

The GIS group works with professionals to create maps of the area such as which land in Shannon County is most suitable for septic systems (turns out, not a lot) or maps of the area with points of interest for the teen such as home, school, auntie’s house, etc. The work crew focuses on acts of service for the community which may include painting a house, building fence, or small home repairs. I work with the leadership group. We take a pre-selected book, re-write it in script form, make puppets and scenery, and the teens perform it for the elementary camp the following week. Our book for this year was The Incredible Water Show by Debra Fraiser. The leadership group also does journaling. For this year, journal topics were taken from the main topics from The Power of Four: know yourself, know your friends, know your enemies and lead the way. During the camp I also get to help teens choose books to take home from a supply of new books provided by a group from Baltimore, Maryland.

Hau Kola is also one of the best professional development experiences for me. I may not be learning about library trends or young adult books (I take that knowledge with me), but I always learn so much about the Lakota culture that has shaped South Dakota and particularly its reservations. This helps me better serve that part of the state’s population and it helps me build bridges between traditional Lakota culture, current reservation culture, and popular culture. It is a privilege for me to work with the Hau Kola Learning Camp and I hope to be able to continue for years to come.




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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2009/aug/2009-08b.asp

Read Around the Clock

Here’s a bulletin board idea to encourage your readers with a bit of old time rock’n roll. Deb Bonte, third grade teacher at Beresford Elementary, and her Vermillion Valley Reading Council committee used the theme and display for their awards night and also to decorate at the 2009 SD Reading Council Conference held in July.


Bulletin board idea from Beresford Elementary


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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2009/aug/2009-08j.asp

Monday, August 3, 2009

What every first-year school librarian needs to know

Every first year school librarian needs to know that developing a library program unique to the needs of their students, staff and administration is a long-term process. But it is a fun and rewarding process with many resources and knowledgeable people at the State Library to help along the way.

Libraries to receive funding for computers, technology training

Twenty-five South Dakota libraries will benefit from the third round of the Opportunity Online Hardware Grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s U.S. Libraries initiative.

The funds will allow public libraries to obtain and maintain sufficient numbers of computer workstations. Eligible libraries can use the money for hardware upgrades, software, and technology support to ensure that their computers will adequately serve the public for years to come.

The South Dakota State Library will administer the grants, and each community library will have to provide an escalating local match to the grant funds over the next two years.

The 25 South Dakota libraries receiving Gates grants are:

  • A.H. Brown Public Library, Mobridge
  • Alexander Mitchell Public Library, Aberdeen
  • Alexandria Public Library, Alexandria
  • Armour Public Library, Armour
  • Belle Fourche Public Library, Belle Fourche
  • Bison Public Library, Bison
  • Deadwood Public Library, Deadwood
  • Emma Burnham Public Library, Frederick
  • Faulk County Library, Faulkton
  • Grant County Public Library, Milbank
  • Grant County Public Library Branch, Revillo
  • Ihanktonwan Community/College Library, Marty
  • Kimball Centennial Library, Kimball
  • Leola Public Library, Leola
  • Marcus P. Beebe Memorial Library, Ipswich
  • Moody County Resource Center, Flandreau
  • Oglala Lakota College Library, Kyle
  • Phoebe Apperson Hearst Library, Lead
  • Rev. Martin Bieber Public Library, Bowdle
  • Selby Community/School Library, Selby
  • Sinte Gleska University Library, Mission
  • Sisseton Memorial Library, Sisseton
  • Vermillion Public Library, Vermillion
  • Wagner Public Library, Wagner
  • Whitewood Public Library, Whitewood

For more information, visit www.gatesfoundation.org or contact Daria Bossman at the South Dakota State Library at (800) 423-6665.



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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2009/aug/2009-08a.asp

Homemade pies motivate


Danielle Wilkinson, community librarian at the Elk Point-Jefferson School/Community Library, loves to bake pies. The high school and adult readers in her community love to eat them. So, for every book read during June, July and August readers enter their names in a drawing for a free pie. Every two weeks a reader wins a homemade pie of their choice. All books in the "Graveyard" (the back stacks where the old books live) are worth two chances.


Read for Pie library promotion








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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2009/aug/2009-08j.asp

Involving young people in technology planning

Have you ever felt like technology moves too fast to keep up with or that tech fads are worse than clothing fads? Have you ever caught yourself saying or thinking that the only people who do keep up with it or can even understand it are young people? (It’s okay, I’ll admit it too.) Why not harness this knowledge and seemingly intuitive know-how of today’s young people to help you with your library’s technology plan?

Every library, school or public, needs to have a technology plan to stay relevant in today’s world.

This should help guide you when you need to update computers or software and give you a foundation for putting it in your budget request. Form a technology planning committee with members from your library board, young people from your community (teens – 30 somethings) and some parents. This will also help make sure you are adequately meeting your community’s needs. Involving young people in your technology planning also makes sense because it is a plan for the future and your young people are the future.

For some sample technology plans, start by looking at Tech Atlas at Technology Planning.




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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2009/aug/2009-08b.asp