Monday, February 22, 2010

Flat Stanley travels the world

Students at Humboldt Elementary School Library are mapping the travels of Flat Stanley from Flat Stanley by Jeff Brown.

Flat Stan went to Washington, D.C. with the school secretary and France with the school librarian, Christy Marketon. A student took him to Omaha and the zoo. In few weeks he will be going to Disney World with one of the third grade teachers. When he returns the students will be helping to make an Animoto of the trip to add to the ones already created.



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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02i.asp

More resources in the news

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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02h.asp
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The Federal Trade Commission, U.S. Department of Education and Federal Communications Commission have just released a new booklet about online safety. A PDF of the 54-page publication, Net Cetera: Chatting with Kids about Being Online, is available at http://www.onguardonline.gov/. Free copies of the brochure can be ordered from the Federal Trade Commission.

According to the 2010-2011 edition of the Occupational Outlook Handbook http://www.bls.gov/ooh/, the job opportunities for librarians are favorable. Looking for a library job? Check out these sites:


Storynory offers free audio books and stories for kids. Storynory audio can be downloaded to your computer or listened to directly from the Web site. For more information, or to listen to stories go to Storynory.com.




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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02h.asp

Should your library have a social media policy?

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Originally published a http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02f.asp
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Social media—Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, and other interactive Web communications—are either great networking tools or bogeymen, depending on whom you ask. As with any tools, their value lies in how they are used.

Proper use of social media helps connect people, create community, and promote yourself, your business or your library. Improper use of social media can cause irreparable damage to careers, reputations and physical safety.

Since social media are here to stay, you may want to develop a social media policy for your library users and employees. Some libraries’ employees already work under such policies written by their funding authorities.

Policies keep usage consistent and clear for all people. Expectations are understood and give you enforcement authority. Policies protect your library from potential liability.

A social media policy should include respect for copyright and for other people. It should encourage accuracy, ethics and civil discourse.

Get information and tips about social media policies for all kinds of libraries in this School Library Journal article: Should Your Library Have a Social Media Policy?.

Learn how to write a social media policy from this Webjunction article: Create a Social Software Policy for Your Library.

Social Media Governance lists organizations and their social media policies, which you may use as templates: Social Media Policy Database.

Having a social media policy allows you to be both sociable and socially responsible.





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Originally published a http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02f.asp

Tuesday, February 16, 2010

South Dakota receives accolades for 2008 Public Libraries Survey

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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02a.asp
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South Dakota was one of 45 states that received the Keppel Award for submitting prompt, complete and high-quality public library data for FY 2008. The award was presented in Washington, D.C. in early December and winners included 12 first-time State Data Coordinators and five first-time Chief Officers. Among these first-time awardees were South Dakota’s Assistant State Librarian, Development Services Daria Bossman and State Librarian Dan Siebersma.
Photo: Accepting the Keppel Award is Assistant State Librarian, Development Services Daria Bossman (center) with Kim Miller, Management Analyst, IMLS Office of Policy, Planning, Research, and Communication; Research and Statistics (left) and Patricia “Patty” O’Shea, Library Programs Manager, Education & Related Statistics Branch, U.S. Census Bureau; Governments Division (right).


Dr. Seuss game for Read Across America Day

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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02i.asp
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Need an idea for getting students—and teachers—involved in Read Across America Day? Try this activity borrowed from one of Douglas School District’s elementary libraries.


  • Select brief quotations from the Dr. Seuss books in your collection.
  • Print each quote on an individual piece of paper.
  • On the big day, post the quotes on the walls outside classrooms.
  • Tell students to remove from the wall and bring to the library a quote for which they can identify the book from which it was taken.
  • Reward each student who correctly identifies the book with an inexpensive prize. Small suckers and bite-sized candy bars work well.

Be prepared for surprises. For example, participation by K-6 grades will likely be anticipated, but when grades 7-12 get wind of what’s going on, they may ask to play along, turning the activity into a K-12 game day where everyone has fun. Your students may also informally set up competition between classrooms to see which room correctly identifies the most quotes. Expect to run out of prizes earlier than anticipated. Both students and teachers had fun with this inexpensive, involving, easily-prepared game.



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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02i.asp

How do I…deal with those techie questions?

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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02h.asp
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“How do I make my computer run faster?”

“How do I set up a formula in Excel?”

“Will the games the after school crowd plays crash the library computers?”

“Is there a free virus scan anywhere that I can use on my computers?”
If you or your patrons have ever had questions like these and you don’t have a ‘techie’ on staff, there is help online for you. We have searched the Web and put together a short list of sites that may help answer some of those questions.



Do you have a favorite or two you’d like to share with librarians across South Dakota? Send the link to Brenda Hemmelman.





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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02h.asp

Monday, February 8, 2010

RCPL shelf guides direct patrons to e-resources





Rapid City Public Library patrons are directed by shelf guides to e-resources they might otherwise miss as they browse the stacks.



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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02i.asp

What is Library Development reading: Strategic Planning for Results

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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02h.asp
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Strategic Planning for Results

Reviewed by Daria Bossman

The State Library has a wonderfully up-to-date and very complete professional library. One popular series in the collection is known as the PLA Results Series. The back cover blurb states, “The PLA Results Series has long served to help public librarians envision, evaluate and respond to community news with distinctive programs and services. Building from this proven model, Strategic Planning for Results is the fully revised version of Planning for Results, the foundational book in this groundbreaking series.”

The author, Sandra Nelson, focuses on the essential steps for drafting what she terms a “results-driven strategic planning process that libraries can complete” within a four-month period. She has crafted this book with small as well as larger libraries in mind. She makes a case that specific, results-oriented outcomes rather than detailed, long-term planning will energize your community, your board and your staff, and this process allows libraries to actually accomplish a well-defined set of goals in a short period of time.

This book is choked full of graphs, forms, outlines, simple to understand bullet points, lists of questions, etc. Want to take a survey to measure symptoms of staff morale? —see the points listed on page 69. You might want to check out the 2007 updated revision of Ranganathan’s Laws: “Resources are for use, Every Resource its user, Every user His Resource, Save time and energy of the user, and the one which stayed exactly the same over 80 years, The Library is a growing organism!”

Here is just a sample of the opening paragraph in the introduction:
“Excellence must be defined locally. It results when library services match community needs, interests, and priorities; Excellence is possible for both small and large libraries. It rests more on commitment than on unlimited resources; and Excellence is a moving target. Even when achieved, excellence must be continually maintained.”
This book is easy to digest and useful in so many ways. The “Key Points to Remember” at the conclusion of each chapter could be used as summaries for an entire board to read together. And if you are into deep research on a particular subject, the references and bibliographies at the end of each chapter are excellent. Request it through interlibrary loan today!


Afoot: a Tale of the Great Dakota Turkey Drive

Reviewed by Joan Upell


It’s all about South Dakota and turkeys in Afoot: a Tale of the Great Dakota Turkey Drive by George Brandsberg. Although published in 2006, this is one of those undiscovered regional treasures. Joshua Greene needs to find his sister. He makes it from Illinois to Pierre in Dakota Territory before he runs out of money. Once he learns that she has moved on to Deadwood, he is determined to follow her. Desperate to find a way, he signs on as a cowhand, but the herd he expects to trail turns out to be turkeys. Based on a true event, this slim volume is full of colorful characters, adventure and compassion for readers from upper elementary through adult.

Other titles now being read by Library Development staff include:

  • The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein
  • Collaboration and Comprehension: Inquiry Circles in Action by Stephanie Harvey and Harvey Daniels
  • Down and Dirty Birding: From the Sublime to the Ridiculous, Here's All the Outrageous but True Stuff You've Ever Wanted to Know About North American Birds by Joey Slinger
  • The Known World by Edward P. Jones
  • The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver
  • Nanny Returns by Emma McLaughlin and Nicola Krause
  • Official Book Club Selection by Kathy Griffin
  • Princess Ben by Catherine Gilbert Murdock




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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02h.asp

Disaster survivors need your help!

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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02f.asp
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Each year approximately 50 presidentially declared disasters cause injury and death, destroy homes and businesses and disrupt the lives of hundreds of thousands of people across the nation. DisasterAssistance.gov brings together all federal agencies that offer forms of assistance to simplify the process for disaster survivors.

DisasterAssistance.gov is a user-friendly Web portal that consolidates disaster assistance information in one place. Individuals in need of assistance following a presidentially declared disaster designated for individual assistance can now go to DisasterAssistance.gov to register online.

As a community information and technology resource, libraries can help increase awareness of and provide access to the DisasterAssistance.gov Web portal. Displaying DisasterAssistance.gov flyers and posters in your libraries will help disaster survivors learn about this resource and encourage them to access the portal at the library or at home.





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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02f.asp

Let Gale Virtual Reference Library answer tough questions

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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02c.asp
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“I heard that I need zinc in my diet. Can you tell me why?”

“I need more information on this chemical element for my chemistry project.”

“Who is Wakan Tanka?”
When questions such as these come to your library, reach for your nearest reference book collection—Gale Virtual Reference Library. This online subscription resource from the South Dakota State Library contains multi-volume, full-text reference books in business, education, environment, history, law, literature, medicine, nation and world, religion, science and social science.


Monday, February 1, 2010

Dakota Middle School receives grant

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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02g.asp
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Rapid City’s Dakota Middle School Librarian Judy Gram was pleasantly surprised by a recent visit from the Rapid City Public School Foundation Prize Patrol, which distributes grants twice a year to selected district educators.
Rapid city's Dakota Middle School Librarian Judy Gram

With approval by their building administrators, applicants submit their grant requests to the Foundation chairperson. A committee of Foundation members then determines whether to fund the requests completely, in part, or not at all. Judy received $400 for the purchase of Playaways to enhance the reading experiences of visually-impaired students and at-risk readers at DMS.





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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02g.asp

21st Century Community Center programs involve libraries

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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02g.asp
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The Feb.19 deadline for the 2010 round of 21st Century Community Center grants is coming up quickly. School libraries across the state are involved with the programs created through this grant in a number of ways. It’s never too late to think about your library’s involvement and plan for the future. Sue Burgard, the Department of Education’s 21st CCLC contact, shared a few ideas about current programs to get you started.

Huron has a program at their middle school. The library stays open until 4:30 four afternoons a week. They have a book club and many times activities they provide result from something the kids have read. Library Assistant Dayna Winter works closely with the book club, chess club, jigsaw competitions and other projects. The director of this program is Laura Willemssen and their librarian is Robert Behlke.

General Beadle Elementary in Rapid City has one of their sessions in their new, lovely library. The use of the library is extended for the after-school program. Nichole Kirk is the director and Julie Martian is the librarian.

The Triad program in Sioux Falls at Axtell Park and Whittier Middle Schools, also incorporates the YMCA, and has working sessions in their libraries. Steve Cain and Dr. Dianna Messick are the program directors. Karen Medema and Louise Johnson are the librarians.

For more information about the application process go to http://doe.sd.gov/ or contact Sue Burgard at (605)773-5238 or e-mail.

If you would like to share information about your school’s 21st CCLC program contact Joan Upell via e-mail.





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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02g.asp

Library gaming is big success in two South Dakota communities

In Edgemont

By Kelly Marriott, Director, Edgemont Public Library

The Edgemont Public Library held its first gaming day on Nov. 14 to correspond with National Gaming Day. The doors were opened for a three hour event that included Xbox 360 and Nintendo Wii video games, as well as many board and card games. A snack table was set up so everyone could eat and drink while playing and conversing. People of all ages attended which made it all the more entertaining and everyone had a great time. The Wii was the most popular for the adults, while the Xbox 360 was the younger generation’s favorite. Chess and cribbage won out in the board/card game section of the event. The library board was so pleased with the concept and attendance that gaming events will now be held throughout the year, as well as on National Gaming Day.


In Milbank

By Jody Carlson, Librarian, Grant County Public Library

The year 2009 was a milestone for Grant County Public Library. It marked 30 years as a county library, as previously it was a Carnegie City Library. As part of the celebration activities held during the month of September a new program was developed. “Literacy thru games @ your library” held its first event on Sept. 19.

Gaming is for all ages at the Grant County Public Library
When the first National Gaming Day was held in 2008 I thought this could work for our community as I looked at all the kids playing computer games after school. The research started; I read articles, took free online webinars, read our library mission statement, and put together a proposal of goals and events for the library board. Our library was very fortunate that, at the same time I was ready with my proposal, we received a substantial donation from a local business for youth activities. With the library board’s approval and the monetary donation the new program evolved.

Our gaming events take place September through May twice a month. The library is promoting the Second Saturday as Family Game Day from 10:30 to 1:00 and the Third Tuesday from 3:30-6:00 as an Open Game Event. Our goal is to enhance our community’s quality of life by offering this as a social connection, enjoyment and enlightenment by expanding their use of the services offered by the library. During our events we offer the use of a Wii and several board and toss across games, such as Apples to Apples, Carcassonne, Blokus, Lucky Ducks and Rat*a*Tat Cat. The library tries to offer something for the toddlers that come in with their parents as well as something adults would enjoy. We always have one of our library volunteers scheduled during our game events to encourage game participation and to assist with set up and questions.

The 2009 National Gaming Day on Nov. 14 coordinated with our normally scheduled Second Saturday event. Information about this special event was sent to the local schools, newspaper and radio stations. Our library took advantage of the information offered through the American Library Association and registered as a participant which enabled us to receive free games from Hasbro, the Gaming Day sponsor. It was a very successful day with our largest attendance yet for any of our gaming days.

Grant County Public Library enjoys being a part of the gaming phenomena that is ingrained in our culture. Our next promotional step will be to make contact with homeschoolers, organizations and clubs to inform them personally of our “Literacy thru games @ your library.”





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Originally published at http://library.sd.gov/forlibrarians/enewsletter/2010/feb/2010-02b.asp